You are viewing rachelmanija

Dear Yuletide Writer

Autumn: small leaves
Dear Yuletide letter below cut. Please do not read if you do not want to read about fanfic.

Read more...Collapse )

Tags:

I have two new novels out!

Naruto: Super-energized!
Last year I wrote two full-length novels under a pseudonym. If you haven’t come across them already, you can read them now. You can read them in either order.

Laura's Wolf (Werewolf Marines). Werewolf Marine Roy Farrell meets reformed con artist Laura Kaplan in Yosemite. Features a snowed-in cabin in the woods, banter, domesticity, PTSD, gun fights, werewolf fights, “let’s get you out of those wet clothes,” light femdom, trauma and healing, out-of-control superpowers, the heroine rescuing the hero, and a pack of traumatized psychic werewolves held hostage by a criminal mastermind.

Prisoner (Werewolf Marines). Werewolf Marine DJ Torres meets genetically engineered assassin Echo in a secret underground laboratory. Features banter, romantic comedy, desperate treks through the desert, martial arts fights, gun fights, werewolf fights, psychic powers, clones, dyslexia, bonding in a bar on the Las Vegas Strip, a dysfunctional werewolf pack, and discussions of Norwegian death metal and Filipino hip hop. (DJ is, in fact, also a DJ.)

Laura’s Wolf is complete on its own, but I will eventually write sequels. Prisoner is the first of a three-book series. It doesn’t end on a cliffhanger, but they are not eaten by the shrieking eels at this time don't get out from under the thumb of the evil lab in this book.

Laura’s Wolf has more genre romance conventions (with substantial twists); the hero and heroine are sexually attracted on their first meeting and bond quickly. It has somewhat unconventional gender roles. Prisoner has fewer romance conventions and subverts the ones that it does have more, and features a friends-to-lovers romance. It has very unconventional gender roles. Laura’s Wolf sold better, but Prisoner attracted more attention in the romance blogosphere.

In case you’re wondering, I have been paying my rent with these books. Which is to say, I didn't make tons of money, but I did make as much or more than if I'd traditionally published. Both of them are way too unconventional, structurally and in terms of content, to sell to any but a small press, so it made sense to self-publish. And the series got two Yuletide nominations, so that makes it all worthwhile.

I wrote them under a pen name because I wanted to write without baggage, emotional and otherwise. Consequently, they are written completely from the heart. Complete with earnest afterwords about PTSD and dyslexia. (They’re self-published, I can put in earnest afterwords if I want to.) Also, I did not want precocious ten-year-old readers of Stranger (or their parents) to type my real name into Amazon and find books with explicit sex.

I wasn’t sure until somewhat recently whether I would ever publicly reveal my real identity. This was unexpectedly freeing. I normally am not capable of writing two full-length novels in a year, while I’m working and in grad school! But I decided to go ahead and reveal so any of you who might enjoy them can find them, given that you otherwise might never read that sort of thing.

Laura’s Wolf is available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Apple, Kobo, ARE, and in print. Prisoner is currently only available on Amazon and in print. If you’d like a copy in any other format, you can purchase it directly from me by either emailing me at Rphoenix2 at gmail or by commenting here with your email address and your preferred format.

Crossposted to http://rachelmanija.dreamwidth.org/1164852.html. Comment here or there.

Yes Gay YA strikes back!

Sakura
Due to the upcoming release of Stranger, I am doing some interviews in which I will be asked how or if things have changed in terms of LGBT characters in YA novels. I am armed, of course, with the most recent statistics. (Summary: representation has increased from 0.6% of all YA novels to 2%. However, most of those books are put out by LGBTQ-specialty small presses, and the percentage of LGBTQ characters in YA novels from American large presses has actually gone down.)

However, I spent the intervening years mostly focused on grad school, and so am not caught up on recent books. Are there any YA novels that have come out since 2010 with LGBTQ characters that I should check out or at least be aware of? What about self-published books? Any prominent LGBTQ teenage characters in non-book media (comics, movies, etc?)

Any changes in your own personal experience? For example, I have noticed that just in my circle of friends/acquaintances, kids seem to be coming out younger (13-15, as opposed to 18-20) and with less or no negative reactions from others. Obviously, these are kids from liberal families in LA. But I always knew liberals in LA, and I did not encounter any kids coming out at age 13 until about five years ago. Ditto straight teenage boys wearing gay rights buttons.

Crossposted to http://rachelmanija.dreamwidth.org/1164181.html. Comment here or there.

Photos: New dresses, hiking, amazing clouds

OTP LA: skyline
I am home sick AGAIN. I am taking Naomi's advice to prophylactically use the steroid inhaler from when I was sick for two months with bronchitis, in the hope of avoiding that happening again.

However, in between being sick, I recently managed to go hiking in Malibu and go to an exchange party where everyone brings things they don't want any more and takes what they want. I obtained three gorgeous dresses, one silk, and two skirts. The skirts are not shown as I went to the party in a dress, so I had nothing to wear on top.

Cut for pretty pictures.

Read more...Collapse )
Books: old
Six of Doris Piserchia's sf novels are now on Kindle for $3.99. (You'd think Hachette could afford to give them covers.) Piserchia is one of those writers who would probably be more famous if she had been male, or written under a male pseudonym. Then she might have been considered ground-breaking and innovative, rather than merely weird. Her books are wild space adventures with a distinctly hallucinatory atmosphere, often starring young women who go for what they want, whether it's sex or adventure, with no regard whatsoever for the proper place of women or what others might think of them. Sadly, that attitude is still rare.

Typical summary (minus female protagonist): It all began when someone tried to push Creed into the flesh pool to be ingested. The assassination failed, but Creed was never the same again. Because it launched the new cliff-dwellers of Creed's colony onto a new course of life - which could lead to humanity's re-emergence as Earth's masters.

In those far future days, Earth's masters were two trees. Not trees as we know them, but two Everest-high growths, whose sentient roots and fast-growing branches dominated every living thing on the world. Men lived between their arboreal combat.


A few quotes from Goodreads:

Levi: Pretty much as bizarre as I remember. I think another reviewer called Piserchia's work dreamlike, and I'm going to second that description. The kind of dream where everything is extraordinarily complex but it all makes perfect sense at the time and it's only when you try to describe it later that you realize you don't quite know where to start.

Vroom: Still delightful, decades later. I remain convinced Piserchia was either heavily medicated or using recreational pharmaceuticals when writing this. My favorite of her writing.

I remember enjoying Spaceling and Star Rider.

My next mention is not a rec per se given that I have not yet had a chance to read it, and it is less easy to obtain than one might expect from an e-book. But this is the sort of thing that I bet a small but select few of you might really, really like.

Graydon Saunders was one of the most interesting posters on rec.arts.sf.written and .composition back in the Usenet Cretaceous Period. Every now and then, he would post excerpts of his fiction. It was completely obvious to me that he was a very good writer, and also that he was way too strange of a writer to ever be published by a major publishing house. His excerpts, which were always quite evocative and beautiful, tended to read as if they were written from an alternate dimension in which fantasy had taken a completely different direction than it did in our world, and the ur-influences were not Tolkien and Lewis, but Beowulf, Njal's Saga, and "Uncleftish Beholding."

He finally self-published his book. Here it is! The March North, by Graydon Saunders Read the comments to this review for an explanation of how to obtain it. I'm sure Graydon would send a copy if you ask.

ETA: Explanation of how to purchase it is now in the comments of the LJ entry.

Crossposted to http://rachelmanija.dreamwidth.org/1163328.html. Comment here or there.

Border Crossing, by Pat Barker

Books: old
I read this because I loved Barker’s harrowing, gorgeously written, revelatory Regeneration trilogy, about shell-shocked soldiers in WWI. Having read Border Crossing… I highly recommend Regeneration.

Tom Seymour, a psychologist, is walking along the river with his soon-to-be-ex-wife when a young man leaps into the river. Tom jumps in and saves his life. And then discovers that the young man, Danny, was once a ten-year-old boy who had gone to prison for murder after Tom had examined him and testified that he was capable of understanding the consequences of his actions. Now both Danny and Tom undertake a quest to understand what really happened on the night of the murder.

Border Crossing, unfortunately, had a lot of elements that many genre readers dislike in mainstream fiction— the middle-aged white man with a failing marriage, the under-characterized wife who wants a baby, the anti-climactic and inconclusive ending in which the point appears to be that real life has no point, a general air of gloom— but without much to compensate. (Regeneration has none of those elements, with the possible exception of gloom. I would argue, however, that it is tragic rather than merely glum.)

The characters are under-characterized. We don’t learn much about Tom other than that he’s a sad sack with a failing marriage (and dubious professional ethics, but those seem to be there to make the plot work.) The wife just wants a baby. The social worker is dedicated. Danny appears to be a creepy, sociopathic, possibly psychotic manipulator who murdered because he was fucked up by an abusive childhood… but is that really all there is to it?

Given the tone of the rest of the book, I started expecting to never find out whether or not Danny is actually a murderer. So I was pleased to find that we do get an answer to that. However, it’s not an interesting answer. SPOILER. Read more...Collapse )

I was left with an overwhelming sense of underwhelm.

Border Crossing: A Novel


Regeneration (Regeneration Trilogy)

Crossposted to http://rachelmanija.dreamwidth.org/1163258.html. Comment here or there.

Coffee Shop Romances: Jennifer Montgomery

Books: old
The Caramel Macchiato Kiss, by Jennifer Montgomery.

A cute romance novella about Callie, who’s starting college and also starting as a barista, and her romance with Justin, the sweet but ever-so-slightly-mysterious boy she meets after hours. They bond over their mutual love of hot caramel and dislike of actual coffee. This is pure comfort reading, high on likability and low on conflict; needless to say, Justin’s secret is the opposite of dark. Sweet and fluffy as a caramel macchiato.

The Caramel Macchiato Kiss (The Coffee Shop Romances Book 1)

The Italian Soda Summer, by Jennifer Montgomery

The second in the Coffee Shop Romances series, but you could read it first. Maddie, a college student, falls for Alessandro, a grad student who will only be in town for the summer. Though still sweet, this one has more of a melancholy tinge; the characters not only feel like real people, they feel like real college students, sometimes pretentious, sometimes moody, sometimes idealistic. The romance progresses largely through earnest yet entertaining conversations about art and life and so forth. It still has a comforting feel, but it’s got more meat to it than the first novella. Very enjoyable.

The Italian Soda Summer (The Coffee Shop Romances Book 2)

Crossposted to http://rachelmanija.dreamwidth.org/1162702.html. Comment here or there.

Two mysteries: Lanyon, Francis

Books: old
A Dangerous Thing, by Josh Lanyon.

Los Angeles mystery writer Adrien English goes to a lonely cabin in the woods to relax and get over his frustrating non-relationship with hot but closeted cop Jake Riordan. (This is the second book in a series, and I didn’t read the first, but presumably that’s the one where they met.) Since this is a mystery, Adrien immediately finds a body, which proceeds to mysteriously vanish. The locals suspect him, so it’s Jake to the rescue! A playful mystery-romance, with lots of banter, sexual tension, and hurt-comfort.

A Dangerous Thing (The Adrien English Mysteries Book 2)

Knockdown, by Dick Francis.

Jonah, a bloodstock agent (horse dealer, basically) discovers unethical practices in the trade; despite increasing levels of menace and violence, he refuses to go along with it, putting himself at higher and higher risk. Meanwhile, his alcoholic brother still refuses to go to AA. But on the bright side, Jonah meets a beautiful air-traffic controller…

This typical Francis set-up goes in some unexpected directions. It’s the darkest of his books that I’ve read. They can deal with some very serious subjects, like grief and depression, but are not grim. The protagonists are put through the wringer, and good people and horses may die. But villains don’t prosper and heroes come through battered but wiser, with a better grip on their own issues and often with a budding romance with some interesting, independent woman.

This is the only Francis book I recall which does not have a happy or at least hopeful ending.

Read more...Collapse )

Knockdown

Crossposted to http://rachelmanija.dreamwidth.org/1162261.html. Comment here or there.
Books: old
1632, by Eric Flint.

A chunk of a modern American town, including the entire local chapter of Mine Workers of America, is mysteriously transported into 1632 Germany. What those people need are red-blooded Americans with lots of guns!

This is kind of hilariously what it is. Apart from Flint being pro-union, it is exactly like every sweaty right-wing fantasy ever, complete with the lovingly described slaughter with lovingly described guns of nameless evil people whom we know are evil because we see them randomly torturing and raping the hapless, helpless villagers. The rape and torture is lovingly described, too. There are also loving descriptions of various engineering projects.

Typical excerpt:

Mike spoke through tight jaws. "I'm not actually a cop, when you get right down to it. And we haven't got time anyway to rummage around in Dan's Cherokee looking for handcuffs." He glared at the scene of rape and torture. "So to hell with reading these guys their rights. We're just going to kill them."

"Sounds good to me," snarled Darryl. "I got no problem with capital punishment. Never did."

"Me neither," growled one of the other miners. Tony Adducci, that was, a beefy man in his early forties. Like many of the miners in the area, Tony was of Italian ancestry, as his complexion and features indicated. "None whatsoever."

Gave up on this. It’s not that I never enjoy this sort of thing. But I have to really be in the mood for it. (Appropriate mood: Snark locked and loaded.)

Free on Baen. Yes. Of course this is a Baen book. There are the obvious exceptions, like Bujold, but Baen has more of a house style than Harlequin.

Stray, by Andrea Host.

An Australian teenager steps through a portal to a strange world, where she survives on her own for a while before being rescued by and taken to another world, where she becomes a lab rat for a bunch of psychic ninjas who fight alien monsters!

This sounds completely up my alley. However, this is my third try at reading it, and I have never gotten farther than 30% in, and I had to force myself to get even that far. It’s written in the form of a diary, which means there’s no dialogue and it’s entirely tell-not-show. I’ve read books like that which I’ve really enjoyed (Jo Walton is extremely good at that type of narrative), but this one never caught my interest. It’s certainly very ambitious— for instance, Cassandra does not speak the alien language, nor does she instantly learn it— but I found it dry and uninvolving.

Sorry to all who recced it so enthusiastically! I will try something else by Host, but I’m giving up on this one. That being said, everyone but me seems to love it, and it’s free on Amazon, so give it a shot.

Stray (Touchstone Book 1)

Crossposted to http://rachelmanija.dreamwidth.org/1162222.html. Comment here or there.

Profile

Sakura
rachelmanija
Rachel M Brown
Website

Latest Month

October 2014
S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Tiffany Chow